<i>Expelled</i> Filmmakers Want to Talk to Baylor President About University's Crackdown on ID Scientists - Evolution News & Views

Evolution News and Views (ENV) provides original reporting and analysis about the debate over intelligent design and evolution, including breaking news about scientific research.

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Expelled Filmmakers Want to Talk to Baylor President About University's Crackdown on ID Scientists

According to the Baylor student newspaper:

Troubled by the Baylor administration's removal of an intelligent design Web site from a Baylor server, a producer from the film Expelled: No Intelligence Allowed is planning a Thursday trip to campus in hopes of meeting with President John Lilley.

Distinguished professor Dr. Robert Marks' personal research Web site on evolutionary informatics was taken down from a Baylor server last month, and producers of Expelled want to speak to Lilley about it.

"We are disturbed with what happened with Dr. Marks," executive producer Walt Ruloff said. "He was working on some really vital research."

(In addition to the news article in the Lariat there is also this op-ed from the executive producer of Expelled.)

Academic persecution has long been a serious problem for intelligent design advocates in academia. And you don't even have to be an ID proponent to get in trouble, you can simply be in trouble for expressing doubts about Darwinian evolution.

While we often see the persecution of scientists and scholars, unfortunately students suffer sometimes as well. But they suffer quietly becuase they know that to speak out could jeopardize their education or harm their careers.

The Lariat article confirms this:

"We think it would be appropriate for the student body to ask the questions," Mathis said.

However, the producers said they wouldn't be surprised if students are hesitant to get involved.

"Students are fearful," Mathis said. "They don't want to go on the record supporting intelligent design."

Through his previous experience on the film, Mathis said students have frequently expressed concerns about coming forward with support.

"The depth of intimidation tactics are unreal," he said. "Students are concerned they won't be able to get into graduate school or get a job."

Mathis also said certain majors are more worried about the stigma of intelligent design than others.

"If you were a biology student, you wouldn't dare touch this," he said.

Finally, help is on the way with a major motion picture coming that will tell the complete story about academic persecution of Darwin doubters.


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